Riverhurst Farm – Wells, Maine – October 10th, 2014

October 8th we rode into Wells, Maine a bustling ocean beach town. We made it, the Atlantic Ocean….thrilling.

Essie Pearl first time on ocean sand.
Essie Pearl & Montana Spirit  first time on ocean sand

7-IMG_0936
 

Neither one of the horses have seen the ocean, its sound, it’s smell. The crashing of waves receding then dashing back at them as their nuzzles sniff with curiosity.How must the bigness of it all that I feel, feel to them? I must admit I was moved to tears at the sight of the ocean, at the sight of my two Fjord Mares who so bravely walked and endured the miles with me stepping into the crashing waves. So many of you ask about their health and care and well you should. They are the true champions of the rides. Essie and Spirit are having a much deserved rest here at Riverhurst Farm. Pete and Elaine have been managing the facility for 17 years. Its lovely, old world, quaint..the barn is 200 years old!!! Once a dairy barn now providing motel space for equine guests the farm has a soft, gentle feel to it, very nice. Parson Beach is a 1/4 mile from the farm.

Here is a bit of history that goes with the old barn. In 1812 the old barn provided a safe haven for soldiers of war. According to the Lewiston Journal illustrated magazine august 1937. The Wells Homestead, now a part of Riverhurst, “Sheltered Soldiers in the War of  1812. It was august 9th, 1813 an exiting day in the history of Kennebunk.  An American privateer, the Alexander of Salem, mounting 18 guns and commanded by Capt. Crowningshield, came up the coast pursued by the British ships.  Before it fell into the hands of the enemy the company were lodged in the Wells home over night , the officers in the house and the seaman in the big barn pictured here. As I said earlier the New Englander’s are not short on history, they are submerged in it.

Last night we were lulled to sleep by the sound of the Atlantic Ocean, the reward after so many miles- months of arduous travel.  We have been here for 3 days and leave in the morning.  Our heads will be shaded from the sun each morning as we face the westward sky. The horses welcome the cooler weather, then so do I, we are all northern bred girls. Thank you Elaine and Pete.
Riverhurst Farm
Rt. 9 Kennebunk
Maine, 04043
207-985-3348
Peter and Elaine King   VideoPete@Roadrunner.com

Riverhurst Farm
Riverhurst Farm

 
a 200 year old floor
a 200 year old floor

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1-IMG_0941
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3-IMG_0946We all – Essie, Spirit and I alike need a rest, it’s good to be here.

5-IMG_0951
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
############################################################################################

Wells, Maine

was an excellent choice to make my east coast landing. The roads leading into town were not terribly busy and for the most part the New Englander’s have been courteous. I know that I am a nuisance to most drivers and I do my best to stay over and off the road surface, but still there you are another distraction for people tulling down the road with other thoughts on their minds. It is dangerous without doubt.
Eleanor Vadenais, executive director of Wells Chamber of Commerce helped facilitate my visit to Wells. I have over the years worked with many  Chamber of Commerce and have always been very glad I did. Eleanor helped arrange newspaper interviews, camping spaces and the Rachel Carson Wildlife Refuge visit. I rode in feeling lost and furlong, dirty and tired of it all. The town was busy,  far too many people stopping to ask the usual what – where – why questions, all had me pushing the limits. Ahead I could make out a figure jumping up and down waving arms. “Oh, I thought “wonderful, its Eleanor, someone at least has come out to greet me.” Hope rose within me. But as I drew closer I could see it was not Eleanor it was Cathy Schloeder and her husband Mike…FROM MONTANA good friends from Montana!!!

Oh my goodness how could this be??? I knew they were in Maine, vacationing, but that we actually were able to connect was nothing short of miraculous and on this day of all days when I most needed a hearty, familiar hug from back home. Cathy was so confident she would find me she’d purchased a lobster roll for me. I felt as if they carried with them a car load of encouragement, smiles, love and hugs from dear friends and neighbors still back in the Northwest corner of Montana, greeting me at this important junction of my ride. I so needed it.  I so very much needed those hugs that day.

With the help of Moores Hardware whose home and place of business we so rudely interrupted Thursday afternoon October 8th – The Moores had land a mile north of where all the shouting and laughing began, I had a perfect place to camp. Eleanor worked her magic, got my next night secured at Riverhurst and the Rachel Carson visit arranged. A full moon presented itself as I ate the food Cathy and Mike left me. I no longer felt alone, what a day…..what a day.

MAINE DINER - this place is hopping
MAINE DINER, Wells, Maine – this place is hopping

#################################################################################################

Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge

I carry with me on my coast to coast ride.. THE INTERNATIONAL LONG RIDERS GUILD FLAG.
I carry with me on my coast to coast ride..
THE INTERNATIONAL LONG RIDERS GUILD FLAG.

2-IMG_0920

http://www.environmentandsociety.org/exhibitions/silent-spring/overview
http://www.fws.gov/refuge/rachel_carson/

This part of my ride has been dedicated to women. As readers following my rides you know  this year we in Montana  celebrate the 100th anniversary of women’s right to vote.  Following a number of stops at women’s historical sites earlier this year – Susan B. Anthony, Elisabeth Cady Stanton, Matilda Joslyn Gage – their homes and grave-sites.  Women whose focused, enduring determination gave me as a woman not only the right to vote but the idea of equality.
I thought how fitting to end this years travels  by paying homage to yet another woman, Rachel Carson she also wrote a new chapter into our history. Facing ridicule and formidable opposition as did the other women she persevered and today her legacy lives on. To her as to all those women who significantly altered the course of history by demanding liberty,  equality she was an individual  committed to changing society.

Biographical entry courtesy of Carson biographer © Linda Lear, 1998, author of Rachel Carson: Witness for Nature (1997)

Rachel Carson, writer, scientist, and ecologist, grew up simply in the rural river town of Springdale, Pennsylvania. Her mother bequeathed to her a life-long love of nature and the living world that Rachel expressed first as a writer and later as a student of marine biology. Carson graduated from Pennsylvania College for Women (now Chatham College) in 1929, studied at the Woods Hole Marine Biological Laboratory, and received her MA in zoology from Johns Hopkins University in 1932.
She was hired by the U.S. Bureau of Fisheries to write radio scripts during the Depression and supplemented her income writing feature articles on natural history for the Baltimore Sun. She began a fifteen-year career in the federal service as a scientist and editor in 1936 and rose to become Editor-in-Chief of all publications for the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Here's the crew holding down the fort, keeping Rachael's legacy alive
Here’s the crew holding down the fort, keeping Rachael’s legacy alive

Disturbed by the profligate use of synthetic chemical pesticides after World War II, Carson reluctantly changed her focus in order to warn the public about the long term effects of misusing pesticides. In Silent Spring (1962) she challenged the practices of agricultural scientists and the government, and called for a change in the way humankind viewed the natural world.

Carson was attacked by the chemical industry and some in government as an alarmist, but courageously spoke out to remind us that we are a vulnerable part of the natural world subject to the same damage as the rest of the ecosystem. Testifying before Congress in 1963, Carson called for new policies to protect human health and the environment. Rachel Carson died in 1964 after a long battle against breast cancer. Her witness for the beauty and integrity of life continues to inspire new generations to protect the living world and all its creatures.

Eleanor from the Chamber of Commerce had time to do a quiet walk thur the park at the Carson Wildlife Refuge with me.
Eleanor from the Chamber of Commerce had time to do a quiet walk thru the park at the Carson Wildlife Refuge with me.

 
##############################################################################
 
I carry with me on the coast to coast Canadian ride...the INTERNATIONAL LONG RIDERS GUILD FLAG
Here We are at Riverhurst Farms the Atlantic Ocean is about 1/4 of a mile behind us. I carry with me on the coast to coast Canadian ride…INTERNATIONAL LONG RIDERS GUILD FLAG

 

LETTER FROM THE GUILD

Dear Bernice,

Often times those who strive to enrich the lives of others never take the time to realize the tremendous long term positive impact they create.  Your journey will serve as a tiny seed, the true results of which may not be fully know for many years.  Perhaps a child you meet will one day tell her grandchild about the woman on a horse who changed her life via a magical journey?  Thus the Guild’s support mirrors your own actions and acknowledges the purity of your mission. Likewise, the Long Riders flag represents all of us who protect, preserve and promote the ancient art of equestrian travel. Protect its message. Carry it with pride and ride well Long Rider.

CuChullaine,                                                                                        September 1st, 2014  Toucy,France

 
 

http://mountaintimes.info/lady-long-rider-travels-the-country-on-horseback/